Fauna

Doi: https://doi.org/10.47659/m6.042.2.pro

Dagmar Kolatschny is interested in exploring the neglected and converting it into something unique in her images. Much of her work is inspired by found photographs. By searching for visual treasures in piles of discarded photographs, she looks for images that explore and evolve her visual language. She studied Educational Science, Psychology and Sociology at Freie Universität Berlin. Until 2006 she had developed computer games for children as a project manager, conceptor and script writer. She studied photography at VHS Kreuzberg and at Ostkreuzschule Berlin. In 2013, she graduated from the MFA program in Photography at Hartford Art School, USA. She lives in Berlin and works in the fields of graphics, illustration and photography.

Dagmar Kolatschny is interested in exploring the neglected and converting it into something unique in her images. Much of her work is inspired by found photographs. By searching for visual treasures in piles of discarded photographs, she looks for images that explore and evolve her visual language. She studied Educational Science, Psychology and Sociology at Freie Universität Berlin. Until 2006 she had developed computer games for children as a project manager, conceptor and script writer. She studied photography at VHS Kreuzberg and at Ostkreuzschule Berlin. In 2013, she graduated from the MFA program in Photography at Hartford Art School, USA. She lives in Berlin and works in the fields of graphics, illustration and photography.

A selection of images that convey this special relationship between humans and animals, which is characterized by familiarity but also strangeness, by desire and domestication. To me these pictures are immediate testimonies of this relationship.

Dagmar Kolatschny: Fauna.
Dagmar Kolatschny: Fauna.
Dagmar Kolatschny: Fauna.
Dagmar Kolatschny: Fauna.
Dagmar Kolatschny: Fauna.
Dagmar Kolatschny: Fauna.
Dagmar Kolatschny: Fauna.
Dagmar Kolatschny: Fauna.
Dagmar Kolatschny: Fauna.
Dagmar Kolatschny: Fauna.
Dagmar Kolatschny: Fauna.
Dagmar Kolatschny: Fauna.
Dagmar Kolatschny: Fauna.
Dagmar Kolatschny: Fauna.
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By searching for visual treasures in piles of discarded photographs, Kolatschny looks for images that explore and evolve her visual language.
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