Oases

Doi: https://doi.org/10.47659/m6.043.1.pro

Marko Stojanović (1982) graduated from the Academy of Arts in Novi Sad. He held solo exhibitions in Belgrade (Remont Gallery, U10 Art Space, DOB and O3on Gallery); Skopje (Museum of Contemporary Art); Ljubljana (Kino Šiška, Art.si); Xalapa, Mexico (Academy of Arts Gallery); Tirana (DeStil)… He participated in the 48th October Salon in Belgrade; Terminal00, Ljubljana; Biennale of Young artists from Europe and the Mediterranean, Bari; Micronaratives, Musée Art Moderne, Saint-Etienne; Giovani Artisti Serbi, Galleria d’Arte Moderna Palazzo Forti, Verona; Second hand, Cvijeta Zuzorić Pavillion, Belgrade etc. His work is part of collections of the City of Belgrade, Telenor Foundation, Museum of Contemporary Art Skopje, Lasalle-Sia College of the Arts Singapore and many others.

Marko Stojanović (1982) graduated from the Academy of Arts in Novi Sad. He held solo exhibitions in Belgrade (Remont Gallery, U10 Art Space, DOB and O3on Gallery); Skopje (Museum of Contemporary Art); Ljubljana (Kino Šiška, Art.si); Xalapa, Mexico (Academy of Arts Gallery); Tirana (DeStil)… He participated in the 48th October Salon in Belgrade; Terminal00, Ljubljana; Biennale of Young artists from Europe and the Mediterranean, Bari; Micronaratives, Musée Art Moderne, Saint-Etienne; Giovani Artisti Serbi, Galleria d’Arte Moderna Palazzo Forti, Verona; Second hand, Cvijeta Zuzorić Pavillion, Belgrade etc. His work is part of collections of the City of Belgrade, Telenor Foundation, Museum of Contemporary Art Skopje, Lasalle-Sia College of the Arts Singapore and many others.

The expected nature, i.e. nature in its non-mediated form doesn’t exist, and what’s left of it are idealized notions and productional aesthetic requirements for what real, unadulterated nature should look like. By photographing new, created (not given) landscapes, images of nature which appear inside a society on facades and buses, as vignettes or decorative elements in homes, Stojanović reaches the concept of oases, the sad tropes of a capitalist fantasy about the prehistoric stage of Nature which doesn’t exist anywhere in its pure form and is impossible to adequately reconstruct or represent. Nature doesn’t need humans, but humans, especially capitalist society, need Nature in order to establish and sustain the order they insist upon, which is based on often incomprehensible strong and inexplicable laws of nature. Although they look like a pair of opposites at first glance, the motifs of nature in society – the foil with a pattern of forest or a mountain glade on an office building glass, or a deer peacefully grazing on the left wing of the city bus’s chassis – are where they belong, perfectly doing their function, convincing us that going to work, accumulating wealth or humbly and politely using the civilization’s attainments such as public transport, are completely natural, real and inevitable like sunset and sunrise. The natural habitat is no longer nature, and our inability to perceive Society as natural and Nature as “socialized” and cultural puts nature into an abstract and perfectly complete world of fantasy for eternity, into an oasis, where the presence of a real everyday man makes for a mistake, a glitch and an excess. (Excerpts from the Completely natural by Marija Ratković – Translation: Željko Maksimović)

Marko Stojanović: Oases IX, Salzburg, 2016.
Oases IX, Salzburg, 2016.
Marko Stojanović: Oases XVII, Vienna, 2016.
Oases XVII, Vienna, 2016.
Marko Stojanović: Oases XVI, Salzburg, 2016.
Oases XVI, Salzburg, 2016.
Marko Stojanović: Oases XI, Amsterdam, 2016.
Oases XI, Amsterdam, 2016.
Marko Stojanović: Oases.
Marko Stojanović: Oases.
Marko Stojanović: Oases.

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Nature doesn’t need humans, but humans, especially capitalist society, need Nature in order to establish and sustain the order they insist upon, which is based on often incomprehensible strong and inexplicable laws of nature.
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The author places his own decision to withdraw to the outskirts into his relationship with the world and keeps returning to his authorial treatment of various peripherals, physical or mental. Even though his works, because of their motifs, often pass into the realm of the sublime, they nevertheless very realistically discuss nature, which has, even after all the interventions during the anthropocene era, managed to withhold and survive.
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