Reacknowledged Structures

Doi: https://doi.org/10.47659/m3.041.1.pro

Mihai Șovăială (b. 1993) lives and works in Bucharest, Romania. After studying at Hochschule für Grafik und Buchkunst, Leipzig (2014-2015), Mihai Șovăială graduated in 2016 from the National University of Arts Bucharest, Photography Department. His work negotiates between documentary and conceptual photography, investigating the relationship between personal experiences and the current local context. His recent works have been included in 4m3 at Alert Studio, Bucharest, in Found&Lost at Float Gallery, Athens and in RAUMKONZEPTE at FotoGalerie Wien. Horatiu Șovăială (b.1987) graduated from the National University of Arts Bucharest in 2009.

Mihai Șovăială (b. 1993) lives and works in Bucharest, Romania. After studying at Hochschule für Grafik und Buchkunst, Leipzig (2014-2015), Mihai Șovăială graduated in 2016 from the National University of Arts Bucharest, Photography Department. His work negotiates between documentary and conceptual photography, investigating the relationship between personal experiences and the current local context. His recent works have been included in 4m3 at Alert Studio, Bucharest, in Found&Lost at Float Gallery, Athens and in RAUMKONZEPTE at FotoGalerie Wien. Horatiu Șovăială (b.1987) graduated from the National University of Arts Bucharest in 2009.

Project Models begins with an analysis and an interpretation of the educational slides made by the Animafilm cinema studio in Bucharest in the 1970s, with varying themes as a basis for teaching foreign languages. The children in the slides were bound to the system they grew up in, which used the image of the so-called “pioneer” to implement teaching methods. Today, these slide albums, which bear witness of recent histories, have lost their initial purpose since their removal from circulation. As a consequence, the people in these scenes lose control of their own image, as most of the slides are nowadays found on sale in flea markets or antique shops without any copyright protection. The possibility of these people being alive brings their identity in discussion, since there is no archive or register regarding the production of these slide albums. Mihai and Horațiu Șovăială attempt to reproduce the canonized image of the three characters from didactic materials by imagining them within the current context, taken out of anonymity, debunked, considered as actual presence in a possible everyday situation.

Mihai Șovăială and Horațiu Șovăială: Reacknowledged Structures: Models.
Mihai Șovăială and Horațiu Șovăială: Reacknowledged Structures: Models.
Mihai Șovăială and Horațiu Șovăială: Reacknowledged Structures: Models.
Mihai Șovăială and Horațiu Șovăială: Reacknowledged Structures: Models.
Mihai Șovăială and Horațiu Șovăială: Reacknowledged Structures: Models.
Mihai Șovăială and Horațiu Șovăială: Reacknowledged Structures: Models.
Mihai Șovăială and Horațiu Șovăială: Reacknowledged Structures: Models.
Mihai Șovăială and Horațiu Șovăială: Reacknowledged Structures: Models.
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The children in the slides were bound to the system they grew up in, which used the image of the so-called “pioneer” to implement teaching methods.
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