Aleksandrija Ajduković

Aleksandrija Ajduković

Aleksandrija Ajduković: Glossy Cows, 2002–2004. Courtesy of the author.
In practice Ajduković experiments as a visual anthropologist who applies fast production and snapshot aesthetics to research the phenomena of fashion, pop culture and lifestyle in urban centers where the latter appear as symptoms of modern life.

Aleksandrija Ajduković is a contemporary artist working in photography, video and film. She began her artistic career by studying at the Belgrade Academy of Arts. In 2018, she graduated from the Faculty of Dramatic Arts in Belgrade with a doctorate in the theory of dramatic arts, culture and media, where she explored animal pattern prints.

In exploring this topic, she researched the media space of countries of former Yugoslavia during the Federation’s last 40 years, searching for various examples of the use of animal patterns in popular and mass culture. She discovered great numbers of fantastic creatures taking on animal forms to create an identity similar to that of a cyborg. The artist sees such transitions between human- and animal-like as potentially subversive in that they interrupt a usual or logical order of things, thereby freeing that which is zoomorphic and instinctive.

In practice she experiments as a visual anthropologist who applies fast production and snapshot aesthetics to research the phenomena of fashion, pop culture and lifestyle in urban centers where the latter appear as symptoms of modern life. Her artistic work is therefore presented as witty reflections hanging in the air and leaving the viewer to decide upon their own ending or interpretation.

In the Glossy Cows series, she turned away from her usual urban hunts for everything unusual and symptomatic and went into a rural environment where she organized a course on the use of reflector discs. Her students were local shepherds and their subjects were their bovine protégées. The artist assembled an unusual film crew, whose purpose was to document itself in its anthropomorphism that is simultaneously a caricature of the usual relationship order.

The Tigresses series took more time. On the streets of Belgrade, Ajduković photographed random women passing her by and wearing clothing with tiger patterns. When asked what motivated her work, she referred to a scene from The Soft Skin directed by François Truffaut. The main hero is sitting in a restaurant with his lover when a lady passes them by wearing a tiger print. Soon after, they notice another woman in the room with a tiger-patterned dress. The lover leans towards our hero and whispers: “These are the women who love love.”

In practice Ajduković experiments as a visual anthropologist who applies fast production and snapshot aesthetics to research the phenomena of fashion, pop culture and lifestyle in urban centers where the latter appear as symptoms of modern life.

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