Samuel Ivin

Lingering Ghosts

Lara Plavčak graduated in art history and cultural studies. In 2011, she graduated from the School of Curatorial Practices and Critical Writing World of Art. To date, she has curated more than 50 major and minor exhibitions individually or in collaboration, and participated in many others in the role of the project manager or assistant at various venues in Slovenia and abroad. Between 2015 and 2019, she collaborated with the Ljubljana Short Film Festival FeKK and the Kraken Association in organizing film screenings equipped with audio description for blind people and subtitles for deaf people. In 2014, as an external co-worker at Kino Šiška, she established the zine collection and public reading room ZINE VITRINE, which today counts more than 400 pieces. In 2016, with the opening of the DobraVaga gallery, she upgraded the zine program with monthly exhibitions, workshops, sales selection, and lectures, and led it until September 2019. In 2017, she co-curated the group exhibition Zines! Contemporary Zine Production at MGLC, Ljubljana, which was based on many years of research into the contemporary production of art zines in Slovenia and internationally. From 2016 to 2018, she worked at the World of Art school and SCCA, Center for Contemporary Arts – Ljubljana. From February 2018 to September 2019, she was employed as a project manager for visual, audiovisual, and intermedia arts at the Kino Šiška Center for Urban Culture, where she prepared the program and annually produced more than 100 events organized by Kino Šiška or co-produced with other public institutions and NGOs. Since October 2019, she works as Assistant Director of SCCA-Ljubljana.

Lara Plavčak graduated in art history and cultural studies. In 2011, she graduated from the School of Curatorial Practices and Critical Writing World of Art. To date, she has curated more than 50 major and minor exhibitions individually or in collaboration, and participated in many others in the role of the project manager or assistant at various venues in Slovenia and abroad. Between 2015 and 2019, she collaborated with the Ljubljana Short Film Festival FeKK and the Kraken Association in organizing film screenings equipped with audio description for blind people and subtitles for deaf people. In 2014, as an external co-worker at Kino Šiška, she established the zine collection and public reading room ZINE VITRINE, which today counts more than 400 pieces. In 2016, with the opening of the DobraVaga gallery, she upgraded the zine program with monthly exhibitions, workshops, sales selection, and lectures, and led it until September 2019. In 2017, she co-curated the group exhibition Zines! Contemporary Zine Production at MGLC, Ljubljana, which was based on many years of research into the contemporary production of art zines in Slovenia and internationally. From 2016 to 2018, she worked at the World of Art school and SCCA, Center for Contemporary Arts – Ljubljana. From February 2018 to September 2019, she was employed as a project manager for visual, audiovisual, and intermedia arts at the Kino Šiška Center for Urban Culture, where she prepared the program and annually produced more than 100 events organized by Kino Šiška or co-produced with other public institutions and NGOs. Since October 2019, she works as Assistant Director of SCCA-Ljubljana.

Samuel Ivin, a British photographer of the younger generation, has in his photo book Lingering Ghosts, which mimics the standardized image of passports, collected 28 bust portraits of asylum seekers, who wait from several months to more than twenty years for an answer to or approval of their status application. The artist has physically disfigured these photos of refugees by scratching out the areas around their eyes with sandpaper and a chisel, thus portraying them as anonymous subjects.

He began the project as early as 2013, when attending accommodation centres in the UK, where he got to meet their residents and monitored their distress and uncertainty of waiting. The book is comprised of the photographs he collected of citizens from Eritrea, Azerbaijan, Iran, Iraq, Syria to Sudan and other countries, who had, after arriving at their desired destination, found themselves in a state of limbo. Despite camouflaging their features with aesthetic scratches, the artist managed to capture the images of people, who have been forced to spend their lives as waiting ghosts, and present them as sophisticated portraits, which even with minimum detailing subtly tell the story of their subjects’ personalities. A dotted t-shirt, combed hair, colourful earrings, sunken cheeks, a tightly fastened sweater or subtle smile speak of the newcomers and how they have been robbed of their identity. The series of photographs opens a topical socio-political theme in a contemplative and un-sensational manner, while its cover page, which through colour, texture and design mimics an A4 size enlarged passport, emphasizes the absurdity of its content.

Samuel Ivin: Lingering Ghosts, Fabrica, 2016.

Fabrica, 2016
70 pages
ISBN 978-88-98764-83-9

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

Similar subject

The origins of interpreting technical images not only as two-dimensional projections but also as geometrical descriptions of objects and scenes dates back to the invention of modern photography itself.
The so-called freedom of choice is turning into an infinite burden. All of this coincides with the ecologic crisis that is influencing all animal species, including humans.
Nature doesn’t need humans, but humans, especially capitalist society, need Nature in order to establish and sustain the order they insist upon, which is based on often incomprehensible strong and inexplicable laws of nature.
The idea of socializing animal instincts, or of making animal actions appear through human understanding, provides the standard moral basis upon which common attachments, identifications and affects with the animal other occur.
Angles of vision can be explored beyond the normal reach of the human eye or the camera lens.
The series of images explores taste and appetite in relation to animal meat.
In street demonstrations, people reclaim the public space on their own terms through their embodied collective actions.
We are basically told how to feel about things, but when that happens in real life there is no script, there is no music, and sometimes really horrific things can unfold in a very, very ordinary way. In a way what is really horrifying about it, is that it is just normal life, except that really bad shit happens.

Our site uses cookies to improve our services. As an user you need to agree to the usage and accept our conditions. We are currently using only necessary cookies for normal web page functioning. For more information visit our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service. For more information on the cookies that we use please check the list below.  

Cookies that we use

PHPSESSID
This cookie is native to PHP applications. The cookie is used to store and identify a users’ unique session ID for the purpose of managing user session on the website. The cookie is a session cookies and is deleted when all the browser windows are closed.

I consent to the cookie usage, agree with the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy and want to continue using the web-page. 

sign up

and get the latest news and calls for papers & projects