Reading time: 11 minutes
Every conceivable object of Nature and Art will soon scale off its surface for us. Men will hunt all curious, beautiful, grand objects, as they hunt the cattle in South America, for their skins, and leave the carcasses as of little worth. – Oliver Wendel Holmes

Abstract

Archives abounding in collections of nineteenth-century photographs contain numerous examples of works dealing with the subject of bodily anomalies. Information about such pictures being taken used to be published on a regular basis in daily press, in which the readership were notified about photo ateliers which immortalised a variety of “monstrosities”. Although it would seem that such pictures were taken solely for scientific purposes, the many and varied contexts of their use let us link them to a much older tradition of viewing and collecting visual curiosities. Having the above facts in mind, this article confronts the popular habits of photographing peculiarities in the 19th century, with museum practice and the Wunderkammers tradition. The space of a photograph may substitute exhibition space, while a desire to watch all kinds of abnormalities and the culture of curiosity determines the connection between former museum visitors and recipients of photographs.

Reading time: 3 minutes
In practice Ajduković experiments as a visual anthropologist who applies fast production and snapshot aesthetics to research the phenomena of fashion, pop culture and lifestyle in urban centers where the latter appear as symptoms of modern life.

About

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Reading time: 7 minutes
Angles of vision can be explored beyond the normal reach of the human eye or the camera lens.

Abstract

Digital imaging may have tied us to the computer keyboard, but it allows us to recuperate for photography the freedom and control that painters and draughtsmen have always had when reconstructing space on a flat surface. Angles of vision can be explored beyond the normal reach of the human eye or the camera lens. For the last few years I have concentrated in particular on the application of orthographic projection to photographic images, both moving and still. I have found that removing the conventional perspective has the effect of defamiliarising and enriching what we see: objects seem to pass directly into memory not as images but as realities.

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Vol. 4, no. 2

last calls for papers and projects

What role do photographs play in the creation, strengthening, or subversion of (the images of) the master? Do the photographs (un)wittingly legitimize the power, or do they recast power within the wider social network of signs?
The belief in some sort of special power of photography persists, our continuous investment with mystical qualities making it one of the most enchanted technologies of present day.
Protest visuals are not simply part of representation of events; they are increasingly becoming tools of political mobilization, resistance and even modes of protesting themselves through image-based activism, documentation and archiving projects and more.
While captivating our sight, animals also look back at us as if questioning our very notion of humanity – as if we instinctively understand that we can only look for human-ness via our engagement with the pet, the wild or tamed animal, the beast.

“For each photograph raises its subject to a degree of abstraction which automatically confers on it a certain generality, so that every child photographed is a thousand children possessed.”

— Michel Tournier

open access

Notes on Preservation, Death and Art

Originally, I was driven by the idea to take pictures of individuals who don't even have any understanding of being depicted.
Reading time: 9 minutes
Salaj is one of those photographers who are characterized by deep reflection of the meaning and perception of image from different, mainly philosophical viewpoints, while at the same time following the objectivistic principles of photography.

About

The article that aims to analyse the artistic production of photographer Bojan Salaj is based on conversations and reviews of his archive. Among Slovenian photographers, Salaj is the one who has been seen as an embodiment of the decisive shift in perception of the photographic medium that occurred in the late 1980s and early 1990s. He has never worked as documentary photographer or photojournalist; his authorial practice has always been primarily focused on the context of exhibition and against unconventional solutions. Salaj is one of those photographers who are characterized by the deep reflection of the meaning and perception of image from different, mainly philosophical, viewpoints, while at the same time following the objectivistic principles of photography. At a glance, his practice is extremely eclectic and post-modern, which is due to the fact that he is not looking to find an individual and recognizable artistic voice; he dedicates his focus to individual projects, bringing into his work various different references and themes. Nevertheless, a central motive can still be perceived throughout his output. In the past 25 years, Salaj has mostly been attracted to the here and now; this includes the fundamental problems of representation of photography in mass media, iconography of power structures, models of construction of history, and ways of establishing national and cultural identities.

Artist Biography
Bojan Salaj (born 1964) is a photographer, who since the early 1990s continuously creates and exhibits his artistic projects. In his works he highlights and questions the representation of photography in mass media, iconography of power structures, models of construction of history, and ways of establishing national and cultural identities. He commonly follows distinctly conceptual approaches and objectivistic principles. Since 1994, he is employed as a photographer at the National Gallery in Ljubljana, and is the author of numerous photographs from the field of Slovenian fine art cultural heritage. He lives and works in Ljubljana.

Reading time: 2 minutes
Reading Chad Moore’s book is like biting into one of Proust’s madeleines. You turn a page, then another one, and suddenly you remember.

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